Weekend Climbing in Pensylvania


Destination: High Rocks State Park ( Ralph Stover State Park)

Location: 150 Tory Rd, Bucks County Pennsylvinia

Time of the Year: Summer 2014

Summer was the perfect time to move from Indiana to New Jersey and immediately after I had settled down with the routine of my new 9-5 job, I began looking up online to find climbing meetup groups.

New Jersey is not that exciting when it comes to rock climbing; but it’s probably not that bad either. There are climbing areas to the north, at the Gunks and then to the south in Pennsylvania state. After browsing through quite a few meetups based out of New York and Pennsylvania, I ended up on a meetup named ‘Red Rock Climbers’. Founded and kept active by a very enthusiastic mountaineer and rock climber named Arnulf Krualla, this meetup climbs in High Rocks State Park in Pennsylvania every weekend. I had met up with one of the climbers in this group at one of my indoor climbing gym sessions around Princeton and after asking with her a few questions about the group and safety of climbing, I felt assured that it would be alright to go with this group, even though I would hardly know anyone.

“This(High Rocks State Park) area has a long history of climbing activity, its been the mainstay for many climbers for many years and is considered a traditional area since most routes are protected using traditional gear. Winter conditions can be very mild in this sheltered southeast facing valley. Summer can be very hot but there’s always the river for a dip to cool off.” (rockclimbing.com)

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Boulder, Colorado – December 2013 – Part III


It had been two and a half days since landing in Colorado and we hadn’t really climbed up any hills or hillocks. But Ajinkya made sure that Chinu and I don’t go back home without stepping foot on the summit of a small mountain by deciding to take us on a hike to Mount Sanitas, a place where all Boulderites love to jog, hike or just walk their dog in the morning.

A group of us took the bus (public transport) from Ajinkya’s home to the point closest to the trailhead. Bus dropped us about 8 blocks away from the trailhead for Mount Sanitas. It was a bright sunny day and the weather was pleasant. Mount Sanitas got its name from Boulder Colorado Sanitarium and Hospital, built in the late 1800′s. According to the government website, “The sanitorium was one of a series of John Harvey Kellogg’s Battle Creek, Michigan, Sanatoriums.  Kellogg, a Seventh-Day Adventist, was one of the leaders of a growing movement in ‘health building and training’ called the Western Health Reform Institute.  The institute promoted ‘hydro-therapy, exercise and a vegetarian diet’ as the way to good health.”

At the trailhead

At the trailhead

At the trailhead

At the trailhead


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Boulder, Colorado – December 2013 – Part II


If you have read my previous post, you would know that the first couple of days in Boulder were just normal touristy sigh-seeing and I did not really step in to the hills. What’s the whole point of going to Colorado if one doesn’t get to do that? Luckily, Ajinkya had planned a visit to Chautauqua Park. As the name suggests, this park is at the location of Colorado Chautauqua (Chautauqua was a popular adult education movement in USA in late 19th and early 20th century) – one of the few continuously operating Chautauquas operating in USA and has been made a National Historic Landmark. The beautiful park is among the hills and is close to Chautauqua Dining Hall and Auditorium. Although the park is very close to Boulder and public bus rides are available, we did not have enough time to hike on the trails in the park; So we just wandered about the grassy terrain, soaking in the Sun and clicking pictures. Post afternoon, we wanted to be at a place called Netherland.

at Chautauqua Park

at Chautauqua Park

at Chautauqua Park

at Chautauqua Park

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Boulder, Colorado – December 2013 – Part I


If you are in the Unites States of America and happen to be a nature and adventure sports lover, then a trip to Colorado will always be in your bucket list. A good friend of mine happened to be studying at University of Colorado, Boulder in the December of last year and although winter is not the season to be in Colorado except for skiing, I decided to go there towards the end of December as that was my only vacation time. Sure, the cold was biting  with a lot of snow and skiing was sadly not in my itinerary, the trip let me see a small part of the land of my dreams for the first time and the first experience filled me with joy! Part I of this series of posts narrates the first two days of touristy wanderings in Boulder and Denver.

Ajinkya, at whose place Chinu and I were crashing, took us on a cold, windy bike ride the evening we landed in Denver and then reached Boulder ( about 1.5 hours of bus journey away). Biking in this small university town nestled among hills was fun but it made my ear lobes and hands pretty numb! The campus of the university is rustic and beautiful and from the terrace of one of the buildings, I got my first panoramic glimpse of hills surrounding the town. It was a cloudy day but on my last day of the trip, Boulder was blessed with sunshine and town looked prettier. From the streets, one could see Flatirons – the five large rock slabs near Boulder. These rock formations came in to existence as long ago as about 296 million years ago and true to the name, they look like an upended flatiron(Wikipedia).  After a walk along Boulder Creek, the primary water flow in the town, we took a stroll along Pearl Street, home to a number of colorful shops and restaurants.

Boulder on a shiny day

Boulder on a shiny day- Just entering the town

One of the buildings in the campus

One of the buildings in the Universoty of Colorado, Boulder campus

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Sport Climbing at Shelf Road, Colorado – March 2014


Have you ever climbed rocks when flakes of snow are flying around you? Have you ever looked down upon a valley from the top of a cliff, after climbing 80 feet up on it? Have you ever slept inside a tent when it’s snowing all around you? Have you known the beauty of an orange sunset that showers the snow-capped peaks with its dying rays and mesmerizes you into staring at them till the darkness falls upon you, replacing the blankness of sky with star-studded awesomeness? Have you gone out with a group of strangers and yet, experienced a warm camaraderie developed quickly through rigors of climbing and living in harsh weather elements, with dirt in your hair & sweat on the clothes? My week-long rock climbing trip at Shelf Road, Colorado was nuanced with such beautiful moments and was one of my best climbing experiences in the outdoors.

Called a sport climber’s mecca, Shelf Road has about 1000 bolted routes on pocketed limestone, with difficulty rating varying from 5.5 to 5.13. In our 5 days long stay, we climbed in 3 of the 6-7 areas in which climbing at Shelf Road is divided. Everyone got a chance to push his/her limits by starting with routes they were comfortable with and slowly graduating to more difficult ones.

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Enjoying the first views of the Cactus Cliff from the Bank

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Cactus Cliff

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Backyard Birds of Indiana


Saturday morning saw a little drop in the chilliness of the air. From -15 degree Celsius the previous day, temperature had risen to +1 degree.

A pleasant sunshine must have invited  birds out of their nests;  cuz I woke up to a lot of sweet chirping in my backyard.

Blessed with a cozy house with a smallish forest ( okay, I like to call it a forest), I feel lucky to have been able to spot these birds in a span of half an hour.

Hope you enjoy these glimpses of Backyard Birds of Indiana ( Bloomington), as much as I enjoyed running behind the beautiful creatures.

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Blue Jay

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Northern Cardinal-female

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Camping in Charles C. Deam Wilderness – Sept 2013


Life is mostly a sinusoidal wave. Sometimes you hit a plateau and keep going until you either take a deep plunge or opt for a steep uphill climb. That way, plateau also is a fun place to be in. At least it leads you to something more exciting. But what happens when you find yourself in a – how do I say it without sounding dull – Plain?

I live in Bloomington, South Indiana – relatively the most hilly part of Indiana state. One would imagine hills rolling away into horizon or something of that sort when I say that. At least those accustomed to the majestic Himalayan heights or the rugged beauty of Sahyadris would do so. But all those folks will be in for a disappointment; because this part of the United States just does not know what real mountains are like. May be folks in Denver know better. Alas, I can’t be there right now.

But fear not, for every place has its own charm and it would be idiotic to miss out on the same just because you could not find your 18000 feet high snow clad peaks here. Bloomington, the county seat of Monroe County,  happens to be only 30 minutes away from an eponymous lake. This lake is the biggest one in the state and is surrounded by forests on all sides. The whole forested area has been divided into various wilderness zones and one fine weekend in September , we decided to camp in one of those. Charles C. Deam Wilderness, which was to become our destination, encompasses 13000 acres of Hoosier National Forest and plays hosts to multiple hiking and horse riding trails.

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Biking Memoirs from Indiana – June-July 2013


If I remember correctly, Windows Operating System used to come loaded with a bunch of scenic wallpapers, one of which featured nicely bundled up hay rolls, lying lazily in the sun. I don’t know the country in which that photo was captured but I was reminded of it recently during a leisurely bike ride in the American countryside.

Imagine rolling corn fields alternating with patches of land full of dried, yellow balls of hay. Imagine a clear blue sky, cracked with white Cirrus lines. Can you see the gray colored path passing in between and along the farms? The path sometimes gets surrounded by tall trees and that makes you feel as if you have entered the woods. You cross a bridge – a river whose name you don’t know yet – flowing below you. And just as suddenly, you come out in the open, to be surrounded on both sides by farms again. They seem to stretch all around you – flatness of the land trying to overpower your usual sense of familiarity with lofty mountain peaks. Raccoons cross you as you pedal by. Almost in conjunction to the strenuous pedaling you underwent at the last bend, a reward appears out of nowhere, in the form of a calm, soothing water body.

Hay Rolls!

Hay Rolls!

Indiana Countryside

Indiana Countryside

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A Week in the American Midwest


I was amusing myself by listening to the peculiar way the park ranger was explaining tour rules and guidelines to the group gathered around him. In the last 7 days, I had found out that Americans like to talk with a lot of animated expressions and gesturing. They modulate their voice quite often too. I was quietly enjoying his way of talking and the tongue in cheek statements when he announced that it was time the tour begins and we lined up with tickets in our hands.

Random trips are an integral part of my life. In the past, random trips is where I have met friends I would later become close to. Random trips is where I got opportunities to write my own adventure stories and those trips are where I got to see a lot of interesting stuff, that I would not have seen otherwise. So you know, random trips mean a lot to me. When I landed in USA about 9 days back to join a master’s course and found that I have a lot of free time before school starts in which I could tag along with new found friends on a drive to Nashville, it was natural that I would not miss the chance.

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